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Home » Plant infomation

Garcinia mangostana  L.

   

Botanical Name

:

Garcinia mangostana L.

English Name

:

Mangosteen

Synonym(s)

:

Mangostana garcinia Gaertner

Family

:

Clusiaceae

 

General Info

Description

A dioecious tree, 6—25 m tall, with a straight trunk, symmetrically branched to form a regular pyramidal crown. Leaves opposite, with short petioles clasping the shoot so that the apical pair conceals the terminal bud; blades oblong or elliptical, 15—25 cm x 7—13 cm, thickly leathery, entire, cuspidate at the apex, glabrous and olive-green above, yellow-green beneath with pale green central nerve, prominent on both sides and with many evenly spaced prominent side nerves. Flowers solitary or paired at apices of branchlets, with short and thick pedicels, ca. 5.5 cm in diameter; sepals 4, arranged in 2 pairs; petals 4, thick and fleshy, yellow-green with reddish edges; staminodes usually many, 1—2-seriate, ca. 0.5 cm long; ovary sessile, subglobose, 4—8-celled with prominent sessile 4—8-lobed stigma. Fruit a globose and smooth berry, 4—7 cm across, turning dark purple at ripening, with persistent sepals and still crowned by the stigma lobes; pericarp ca. 0.9 cm thick, purple; 0—3 of the cells containing a fully developed seed, enveloped by a white arillode.

Herb Effects

Acts as a febrifuge (decoction of the leaves and bark); emmenagogue (root decoction); astringent (rind extract)

Links

Center for New Crops & Plant Products, at Purdue University
King's American Dispensatory
PROSEA (Plant Resources of South-East Asia) Foundation

Chemistry

Active Ingredients

Ascorbic acid, beta-carotene, citric acid, mangostin, niacin, pectin, riboflavin and thiamin (fruit); betulin (leaf).

Chemistry of Active Ingredients
Product Categories

Name

CAS#

IUPAC Name

Formula

Structure

Product Categories
Ascorbic Acid Not Available 2-(1,2-dihydroxyethy
l)-4,5-dihydroxy-fur
an-3-one
C6H8O6 Click Here To Enlarge
Beta carotene 7235-40-7 3,7,12,16-tetramethy
l-1,18-bis(2,6,6-tri
methyl-1-cyclohexeny
l)-octadec a-1,3,5,
7,9,11,13,15,17-nona
ene
C40H56 Click Here To Enlarge
Citric acid Not Available 2-hydroxypropane-1,2
,3-tricarboxylic
acid
C6H8O7 Click Here To Enlarge
Mangostin Not Available 1,3,6-trihydroxy-7-m
ethoxy-2,8-bis(3-met
hylbut-2-enyl)xanthe
n-9-one
C24H26O6
Niacin 99148-57-9 Pyridine-3-carboxyli
c acid
C6H5NO2 Click Here To Enlarge
Pectin 9047-18-1 Not Available Not Available
Riboflavin Not Available Not Available C17H21N4O9P Click Here To Enlarge
Thiamin 59-43-8 2-[3-[(4-amino-2-met
hyl-pyrimidin-5-yl)m
ethyl]-4-methyl-1-th
ia-3-azoni acyclope
nta-2,4-dien-5-yl]et
hanol
C12H17N4OS+ Click Here To Enlarge
Betulin Not Available Not Available C30H50O2 Click Here To Enlarge

Pharmacology

Medicinal Use

The sliced and dried rind is powdered and administered to overcome dysentery. Made into an ointment, it is applied on eczema and other skin disorders. The rind decoction is taken to relieve diarrhea and cystitis, gonorrhea and gleet and is applied externally as an astringent lotion. A portion of the rind is steeped in water overnight and the infusion given as a remedy for chronic diarrhea in adults and children. The rind extract is used in catarrhal conditions of the throat, bladder, urethra, and uterus, etc. A decoction of the leaves and bark is used to treat thrush, diarrhea, dysentery and urinary disorders. A root decoction is taken to regulate menstruation. A bark extract called "amibiasine", has been used for the treatment of amoebic dysentery. An infusion of the leaves, combined with unripe banana and a little benzoin is applied to the wound of circumcision.

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